disruptism

8bitfuture:

Video: castAR Kickstarter demonstration.

castAR is a projected augmented reality system that displays holographic-like 3D projections right in front of you. Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope sparked our imaginations of what might be possible in the future by showing R2-D2 and Chewbacca playing a holographic 3D chess-style game. It has taken nearly 35 years since the film was released for this technological dream to come to reality, but with castAR, that reality can be yours.

castAR includes a very fast and highly precise tracking solution, allowing you to change your experience by holding your 3D world in place while you are free to move around in it.

With three weeks left in their campaign, there’s still time to get your own - packages start at US$189.

brookhavenlab
brookhavenlab:

When people talk about the beauty of science, it often brings to mind brilliant images of the stars. But there’s beauty in the machines that take those stellar shots, as well. 
These digital camera CCDs—four chips with 16 segments each—will join 196 others inside the massive 3.2-gigapixel camera of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), which will take an unparalleled wide-angle survey of the sky from atop the Chilean mountains of the Atacama Desert. The sensors were designed at Brookhaven to be sensitive to light outside the visible spectrum.
This false-color image shows the CCD chips illuminated by near infrared light—the wavelength range where the LSST will study distant galaxies in its quest to reveal the secrets of dark energy and dark matter. The patterns are interference fringes caused by small thickness variations in the silicon wafer from which they were fabricated, but these striking contours will not impact performance. The telescope will ultimately image 5 billion galaxies, and in conjunction with platforms such as Google Earth, LSST will build a 3D virtual map of the cosmos, allowing the public to fly through space from the comfort of home.

brookhavenlab:

When people talk about the beauty of science, it often brings to mind brilliant images of the stars. But there’s beauty in the machines that take those stellar shots, as well. 

These digital camera CCDs—four chips with 16 segments each—will join 196 others inside the massive 3.2-gigapixel camera of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), which will take an unparalleled wide-angle survey of the sky from atop the Chilean mountains of the Atacama Desert. The sensors were designed at Brookhaven to be sensitive to light outside the visible spectrum.

This false-color image shows the CCD chips illuminated by near infrared light—the wavelength range where the LSST will study distant galaxies in its quest to reveal the secrets of dark energy and dark matter. The patterns are interference fringes caused by small thickness variations in the silicon wafer from which they were fabricated, but these striking contours will not impact performance. The telescope will ultimately image 5 billion galaxies, and in conjunction with platforms such as Google Earth, LSST will build a 3D virtual map of the cosmos, allowing the public to fly through space from the comfort of home.